Amy Rogers

Science thriller writer

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Visit Amy's blog & book reviews @ ScienceThrillers.com


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What critics are saying about Petroplague:


From Paul McEuen, author of international bestseller
Spiral:

“Petroplague is a terrific thriller debut and Amy Rogers really knows her science. From a killer premise—scientists create a bacterium that stops the industrial world in its tracks—Petroplague ratchets up the tension and danger with every chapter. The tense, tight plot and interesting characters kept me reading late into the night wondering how Christina Gonzalez, the grad student at the center of it all, would stop the scourge that she unwittingly set loose. Amy Rogers is one to watch—I can’t wait for her next book.”

From Norb Vonnegut, author of thrillers
Gods of Greenwich and Top Producer:

“Amy Rogers is the crisp, haunting new voice of science thrillers. If you think global warming is scary, wait till you read Petroplague.”


From BookTrib reviewer Seeley James:

This is the best science-thriller I’ve read this year. Maybe ever. You might think a PhD-level science story would be short on thrills. You’d be wrong. You might think a book by a certifiable genius might be hard to read. You’d be wrong. You might think, this is gonna hurt my brain the way A Brief History of Time hurt my brain. You’d be wrong. Well, some of you. Every scientific concept in Petroplague is not only accessible, it’s crystal clear. Not like other science-thrillers where you just go along with it. You know what I mean, those “trace evidence” stories that have you skimming through arcane bits about molecular science, accepting them because you’re afraid they’re so full of baloney that knowing better would ruin the book you just paid $15 for? Petroplague is not like that. Not at all. It not only makes sense, it teaches you everything you need to know to grasp the story—and then some. Plausibility, originality, and thrills make the thriller. If you are the science-thriller evangelist in your circle of friends, read and recommend this book.

From
LabLit.com by Ian Brooks:

“...the book is a great example of lab lit in what I think of as the Crichtonesque School of epic science disaster writing. Michael Crichton was one of the first modern scientist-authors to take scientists out of the lab and make them human characters in the daily drama of their science. Andromeda Strain is an obvious early example of scientists working to the save the world from an unknown and faceless microscopic horror. Similarly I was reminded of Michael Palmer’s The Fifth Vial with its powerful and well-written female lead whose character develops throughout the course of the book, and with it our appreciation of her strength in the face of adversity. Amy Rogers has done an excellent job of not only crafting an exciting and thrilling piece of lab lit fiction, but also of offering an education in the science behind the scenes and a glimpse of a future we might face.”

From
ScienceBlogs We, Beasties by Kevin Bonham:

The science is utterly believable...Rogers goes out of her way to actually talk about a scientist and the way science is done as more than just caricatures. If you’re into thrillers, and you like your science accurate, this {ebook} seems a steal.”

From MrNeil on ThrillersRockTwitter:

One of the my favorite rewards of writing for ThrillersRockT is the opportunity to discover new authors. Amy Rogers is one of those pleasant surprises, and her debut novel, Petroplague, has earned a spot in the top five on my Best of Twenty-Eleven list. Amy uses her extensive science background and research connections to create an intense thriller (or SciThri borrowing from Forrest J. Ackerman) that balances technology with well defined, likeable and believable characters.”

From PopcornReads:

“It’s wonderful to read a thriller like Petroplague whose author knows her subject backwards and forwards, and demonstrates it on every page. As someone who lives in the LA area, I always look for signs that someone doesn’t know this area or how it operates. Amy Rogers nails every aspect of LA, from neighborhoods to our isolation in the event of a disaster like this one...Amy Rogers also nails the science big time, and even provides technical notes at the end. On the surface, Petroplague looks like a disaster that could take mankind back to its pre-industrial stage; however, the consequences are much, much farther reaching than that. It’s a fun “what if” novel. Another one I couldn’t put down!”

From International Thriller Writer’s webzine
The Big Thrill (September 2011, article written by literary agent Andrew Zack):

“Wow.  I’m almost out of breath just reading that.  Rogers, who studied biochemistry at Harvard and went on to get an MD/PhD at Washington University in St. Louis, knows her stuff and her book should appeal to fans of Michael Crichton and others who like science thrillers.  The science in the book is real and, according to Rogers, “You’d have to have a PhD to figure out where it veers into fiction.”


From amazon reviewer and author L.A. Starks
:

Compellingly written, technically literate...What a pleasure to read a book by an author who knows her way around hydrocarbons--from the lightest C4 methane to the heaviest La Brea tar sands--and who also treats her readers to freshly-drawn characters like Christina the scientist, and her flightier cousin, River. If you like books by Michael Crichton, technothrillers, books with female protagonists, or even just a good novel with real insight into the oil industry, read Petroplague.”

From writer Morgan Mussell:

“Think of all the seat gripping you do watching James Cameron movies like The Terminator and Titanic.  This is what Amy Rogers does; she throws the good guys into a tight situation and keeps cranking up the pressure...It’s always a pleasure to post here about a book I really enjoyed.  I couldn’t put this one down.”

From author & editor Darrell Delamaide:

Motor-driven LA is, of course, the perfect place to feature a gasoline-eating bug and the picture of a city paralyzed and quarantined by the disappearance of all petroleum products is captivating.

From E&K Family Book Review:

The mixture of real life science with fiction was fantastic. I didn't know what was real and what was impossible until the very end where the author cleverly inserts the facts. I love the bond between our 3 main characters. The author did a great job creating personalities and believable traits, I really felt like I understood each of them and where they were coming from.”